Winter 2014 – Declaration of Helsinki: What Does the Future Hold?

Declaration of Helsinki: What Does the Future Hold?
 
Margaret D. Chi* and Michelle A. Dwyer
 
Author Affiliations:
College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

 
 
Corresponding author: Margaret D. Chi MPH; chimarga[at]msu.edu
 

Key Words: Research Ethics; Medicine; Human Research Subject Protection; Informed Consent; Helsinki Declaration; Bioethics
 
Full Text Article PDF
 
Corresponding author: Margaret D. Chi MPH; chimarga[at]msu.edu
 

Key Words: Research Ethics; Medicine; Human Research Subject Protection; Informed Consent; Helsinki Declaration; Bioethics
 
Abstract:
Within the world of medical research, the Declaration of Helsinki (DoH) has long been considered the cornerstone document explaining the “rules” of ethical human research. Developed in 1964 by the World Medical Association to protect the rights of research subjects, it originally contained a set of 11 articles explaining the basic ethical duties of physicians in regards to research. The original version took aspects of the Nuremburg Code and Declaration of Geneva to incorporate human experimentation with the physician’s ethical role in the process and delineated a patient’s rights of informed consent, privacy and safety1,3. Since then, it has undergone seven revisions and grown in length from 11 to now 37 articles, with categories ranging from General Principles to Risks to Informed Consent (http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/index.html)2. Though considered comprehensive and accurate in some aspects, it has not been without controversy over the years. Therefore, this year, which commemorates the 50th anniversary of the document, we must ask, how has the relevance of DoH changed, and will it change further in the future?

 
Published: January 1, 2014
 
Senior Editor: N/A
 
Junior Editor: N/A
 
DOI: Pending
 
Citation:
Chi MD, Dwyer MA. Declaration of Helsinki: What Does the Future Hold?. Medical Student Research Journal. 2014;3(Winter):20-2.
 
 
References:
1. Carlson, RV, Boyd KM, Webb, DJ. The Revision of the Declaration of Helsinki: Past, present and future. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2004; 57(6):695-713. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2004.02103.x.
 
2. Nbebele, P. The Declaration of Helsinki, 50 years later. JAMA. 2013; 310(20):2145-6. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.281316.

 
3. World Medical Association. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles form medical research involving human subjects. JAMA. 2013; 310(20):2191-4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.281053.
 
4. Millium, J, Wendler, D, Emmanuel E. The 50th Anniversary of the Declaration of Helsinki: progress but many remaining challenges. JAMA. 2013; 310(20):2143-4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2013.281632.
 
5. Coyne, J. Revised Ethical Principles Have Profound Implications for Psychological Research. PLOS Blogs. 2013. http://blogs.plos.org/mindthebrain/2013/10/20/revised-ethical-principles-have-profound-implications-for-psychological-research/ [cited 30 November, 2013].

 

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Kevin Patterson

Executive Editor
Kevin Charles Patterson is a fourth year medical student at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine. He is in his eighth year at MSU after graduating with a B.S. in Human Biology and a B.S. in Microbiology, both in 2010. He is considering a career in internal medicine with a combined scientist training program in residency; after residency, his plans include the possibility of a fellowship and the ultimate goal of practicing academic medicine. Editor Note (2013-14): Kevin graduated, matched, and is a resident in Internal Medicine at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.