Vol 5: Winter 2017

Vol 5: Winter 2017

Volume 5: Winter 2017
Letter From the Editors. James Polega, Garrett Roe, and Danny Yau. The editors of MSRJ are excited to announce our Winter 2017 issue. We would like to thank everyone for waiting patiently during our brief hiatus. Since the release of our last issue we have been working diligently to retool our publish- ing process and we are delighted to announce the result of this work. All articles accepted for publication in MSRJ will now be featured as an electronic publication ahead of appearing in our print issue.

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Vol. 4: Winter 2015

Vol. 4: Winter 2015

MSRJ – Volume 4 – Winter 2015

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Vol. 4: Fall, 2014

Vol. 4: Fall, 2014

MSRJ – Volume 4 – Fall 2014   The entire issue can be downloaded as a pdf: here   Excerpts from the abstract and links to individual articles are displayed below. Letter From the Editors. Jessica L. Wummel, Jack Mettler. The editors of MSRJ are excited to announce our Fall 2014 issue, the first issue of the new academic year. We have been overwhelmed with amazing articles from medical students around the world and this has allowed us to publish our largest issue yet! This issue includes stimulating articles written by students from the University of Toronto, Creighton University School of Medicine, Saba University School of Medicine, Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Link here. Broken. Timothy DeKoninck. There are several elements symbolized in the mosaic that represent a doctor-patient relation- ship. This piece of work strives to piece together and 10 serve as a reminder of the elements that make for a successful and impactful relationship. Link here.  A Review of the Psychological and Emotional Issues in Men with Prostate Cancer and their Partners. Dane E. Klett. Howard L. Harrod on his struggles with prostate cancer (PCa): ‘Not only had I a sense of having been mutilated, but I had lost the very capacities that were symbolically associated with manhood’.1 Many patients with PCa experience this jolt to their sense of manhood, thus making PCa unique among the various cancer diagnoses and worthy of independent discussion. In addition, PCa remains the most common male cancer and the third leading cause of all male cancer deaths.2 Most physicians are aware of the link between cancer and mental health issues, but many forget or overlook just how important it is to address a patient’s state of mental health. Link here.  Acute Bronchiolitis – Case Report and Review of Management Guidelines. Neil D. Dattani, Clare M. Hutchinson. Introduction: The treatment of acute bronchiolitis is controversial, despite the fact that several well-designed trials have been conducted on the subject. Patient profile: A 10-month-old boy presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of upper respiratory tract symptoms and an expiratory wheeze. Chest X-ray showed right upper lobe atelectasis. He was diagnosed with acute bronchiolitis. Interventions: He received nebulized salbutamol (albuterol) and oral dexamethasone in the emergency department. He was admitted to hospital overnight for continued salbutamol treatment via a metered-dose inhaler. Discussion: Five main treatment regimens exist for acute bronchiolitis nebulized epinephrine (adrenaline), other bronchodilators, nebulized hypertonic saline, glucocorticoids, and combinations of these. Nebulized epinephrine decreases the rate of hospitalization, other bronchodilators improve symptoms, and nebulized hypertonic saline reduces the length of hospitalization. There is no strong evidence for glucocorticoids or combinations of these treatments. Combined treatment with epinephrine and dexamethasone reduces rate of hospitalization. Link here.  Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: A Potential Indicator of Muir Torre Syndrome. Stacie L Clark. Introduction: Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare dermatologic tumor affecting the pilosebaceous apparatus of the skin. While the majority of sebaceous carcinomas arise from sebaceous glands in the ocular area, extraocular sebaceous carcinomas, arising from any region populated with sebaceous glands have also been reported. Sebaceous carcinoma can present as a single lesion or in association with secondary malignancies, most commonly with those found in Muir Torre syndrome (MTS), an autosomal dominant condition associated with several types of sebaceous neoplasms as well as a variety of visceral malignancies. The most common form of MTS has been described as a variant of hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome). Patient profile: Here, we describe...

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Vol. 3: Spring, 2014

Vol. 3: Spring, 2014

The MSRJ’s Spring 2014 Issue has arrived! Articles in this issue are from University of East Anglia Norwich Medical School, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, the University of the East Ramon and Michigan State University College of Human Medicine.

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Vol. 3: Winter, 2014

Vol. 3: Winter, 2014

The MSRJ’s Winter 2014 Issue has arrived! Articles are from Creighton University School of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, and Michigan State University College of Human Medicine.

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Vol. 3: Fall, 2013

Vol. 3: Fall, 2013

The MSRJ’s Fall 2013 Issue has arrived! Check out articles from Michigan State University – College of Human Medicine and Creighton University – School of Medicine.

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