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Medals 4 Mettle

Posted by on Mar 17, 2016 in Articles, ePubs | 0 comments

Medals4Mettle: A Program to Enhance the Medical Student-Patient Bond

Author: McKenzie Vater MS31*, Pradip D. Patel MD2, Kanyalakshmi Ayyanar, MD3, Autumn Marks, RN BSN CPHON4, Craig Ziegler, PhD5, Karen Hughes Miller, PhD6

Author Affiliations:

1Medical Student, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA.

2 Professor of Pediatrics, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA.

3 Associate Professor, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.

4Practice Manager, University of Louisville Physicians Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders, Louisville, KY, USA.

5 Biostatistician, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA.

6 Associate Professor, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA.

Full Text Article PDF

Corresponding Author: McKenzie Vater, mrvate01@louisville.edu

Key Words: service learning, humanism, empathy, student/patient communication, extracurricular activity

 

Abstract:

Introduction: Humanism is a necessary component of patient care. Medical schools are implementing strategies to educate students about humanism in medicine. The University of Louisville School of Medicine (ULSOM) encourages such practices through collaboration with Medals4Mettle (M4M), a non-profit organization that gives marathon medals to patients battling debilitating illnesses. The ULSOM’s chapter matches students participating in the Kentucky Derby Half/Full Marathon with pediatric patients, allowing students to establish a relationship with their “running buddies” prior to gifting their medals on race day as an act of support and acknowledgement of their struggle. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ULSOM chapter and to create a replicable model for other institutions to employ.

Methods: We conducted a survey for current and previous student and patient/parent participants. Participants were asked to complete six 5-point Likert scaled questions anchored with “Strongly Disagree” to “Strongly Agree” and three open-ended questions. The surveys were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test for quantitative analysis and Pandit’s variation of Glaser and Straus’ constant comparison for qualitative analysis.

Results: Data was collected from 62 medical students and 21 patients or parents (49% and 33% response rate, respectively). Five of the scaled questions had mean scores above 4.0, revealing that the majority of participants would recommend the M4M program to others and that M4M helped students relate to their patient on a personal level. The qualitative analysis identified four themes among participants: M4M is a wonderful program, it provides a patient benefit, people want to re-participate, and it allows you to connect with others.

Discussion: Findings from the survey suggest the implementation of programs like M4M will promote the integration of humanistic practices into medical school curricula. In the future, we plan to pair medical students with the patients earlier to create a longer-lasting, more meaningful relationship prior to the race.

 

Published on date: March, 2016

 

DOI: 10.15404/msrj/03.2016.0002

Citation: McKenzie et al. Medals4Mettle: A Program to Enhance the Medical Student-Patient Bond, Medical Student Research Journal (2016). doi: 10.15404/msrj/03.2016.0002

References:

  1. Dossett ML, Kohatsu W, Nunley W, Mehta D, Davis RB, Phillips RS, Yeh G. A medical student elective promoting humanism, communication skills, complementary and alternative medicine and physician self care: an evaluation of the HEART program. Explore. 2013 Sep-Oct;9(5):292-8.
  2. Moyer CA, Arnold L, Quaintance J, Braddock C, Spickard A 3rd, Wilson D, Rominski S, Stern DT. What factors create a humanistic doctor? A nationwide survey of fourth-year medical students. Acad Med. 2010 Nov;85(11):1800-7.
  3. Chou CM, Kellom K, Shea JA. Attitudes and habits of highly humanistic physicians. Acad Med. 2014 Sep;89(9):1252-8.
  4. Magnezi R, Bergman LC, Urowitz S. Would your patient prefer to be considered your friend? Patient preferences in physician relationships. Health Educ Behav. 2014 Aug 25.
  5. Branch WT Jr. Treating the whole patient: passing time-honored skills for building doctor-patient relationships to generations of doctors. Med Educ. 2014;48:67-74.
  6. Duong DV. Caregiving as good doctoring. Acad Med. 2013 Nov;88(11):1678-9.
  7. Williams GC, Frankel RM, Campbell TL, Deci EL. Research on relationship-centered care and healthcare outcomes from the Rochester biopsychosocial program: a self-determination theory integration. Fam Syst Health. 2000;18(1):79-90.
  8. Schaechter, JL, Canning EH. ‘Pals’ a medical student public service program. West J Med. 1994 Oct;161(4):390-2.
  9. Burks DJ, Kobus AM. The legacy of altruism in health care: the promotion of empathy, prosociality and humanism. Med Educ. 2012; 46:317-25.
  10. Eckenfels, EJ. The purpose of service learning. Fam Med. 2009; 41(9):659-62.
  11. Isenberg SF. Physician founds charity to honor collective ‘mettle.’ IBJ. 2006 Feb 6;26(49):A38.
  12. Center for Disease Control (CDC) Handbook on program Evaluation Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/eval/guide/CDCEvalManual.pdf
  13. IBM Corp. Released 2013. IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Systat Software, Released 2008 .
  14. Pandit, NR (1996) Creation of Theory: A Recent Application of the Grounded Theory Method. The Qual Repo 2(4). Available online at http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR2-4/pandit.html
  15. Cohen, Jacob. Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1988. Print

New Feature: MSRJ e-Publications

Posted by on Mar 17, 2016 in Featured | 0 comments

New Feature: MSRJ e-Publications

epub early access picture

MSRJ’s Exciting New Feature!

The staff of MSRJ is extremely pleased to announce the addition of an exciting new feature to our journal! Starting today, we will be launching MSRJ e-Publication, which will be our first ever early-access publication issue. MSRJ e-publication will enable us to publish articles “online before print” as many other journals do. This new feature has many advantages for our student contributors including:

  • Faster publishing time for accepted manuscripts
  • Increased ease of access
  • Greater longevity of published literature
  • Assignment of a unique Digital Object Identifier number

We want to express our appreciation and thanks to the authors who have been instrumental in getting this put together. We invite you to take a look at their articles in our first-ever e-Pub Early Access Issue:

 

Combating Obstacles to Empathy: A Replicable Small Group Discussion Series for Medical Students.

Authors: Francesca P. Kingery, M.S., Alexander Bajorek, M.D. M.A., Amber Zimmer Deptola, M.D. Karen Hughes Miller, Ph.D., Craig Ziegler Ph.D., Pradip D. Patel M.D.

Medals4Mettle: A Program to Enhance the Medical Student-Patient Bond

Authors: McKenzie Vater MS3, Pradip D. Patel MD, Kanyalakshmi Ayyanar, MD, Autumn Marks, RN BSN CPHON, Craig Ziegler, PhD, Karen Hughes Miller,PhD

Does Traditional Chinese Medicine Matter? Medical Choices of Rural Diabetic Patients in Changsha, China.

Authors: Xiaoyue Mona Guo, B.A., Shuiyuan Xiao, M.D., Ph.D.

Time to Neurological Deterioration in Ischemic Stroke.

Authors: James E. Siegler, MD; Karen C. Albright, DO, MPH; Alexander J. George, BS; Amelia K. Boehme, MSPH; Michael A. Gillette, MPH; Andre D. Kumar, MD; Monica Aswani MSPH; Sheryl Martin-Schild, MD, PhD

 

What is e-Publication?

With MSRJ ePubs, not only will student authors be able to see their manuscripts published earlier, but each article will be assigned an individual Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number. A DOI number is a unique alphanumeric string assigned to a digital object. The DOI number is then registered with CrossRef.org, which is an official DOI registration agency dedicated to providing reliable and efficient reference linking for online scholarly material.

Each DOI uniquely identifies the article and provides a permanent link that takes readers to that particular electronic document, even if the web address which originally hosted the article changes.

These DOI’s already exist in various online journals such as JAMA and NEJM. They also provide ease of citation since they provide a short, easy, and unchanging link to the original document as opposed to a lengthy web address.

 

What Does This Mean for Student Contributors?

The use of DOIs enables us to safely publish intellectual property on the internet, prior to print, and without fear of plagiarism. The fact that DOIs are registered with Crossref © makes them permanent, so our student authors will always be able to find their articles, even many years down the road, using just that unique identifier. Finally, it makes these articles easy to reference, for any future researchers.

At any point in the future, people can access an article just by typing doi.org/ followed by the DOI number. This will automatically take you to wherever the article is housed at that time. It’s that simple!

Starting from today onwards, accepted manuscripts which have been prepared for e-Publication will be available for viewing under the new tab “ePubs” under “Publications” on the MSRJ website. Once we are off the ground, our MSRJ Tech Team will continue to work with the Executive Editors to format and prepare accepted manuscripts for e-Publication, and will continue fine-tuning the process to ensure smooth and continuous e-Publishing.

 

Behind the Scenes Work:

We would like to extend a special thanks our wonderful MSRJ Tech Team for their endless energy and tireless work towards getting e-Publication launched and helping our journal continue to grow. This has been no small feat, and we could not have done it without them! Leading the charge are Danny Yau and Danielle Levy, second-year medical students at MSU-CHM. They have been instrumental in designing the MSRJ template for our e-Publications, getting the MSRJ set up to accept and publish e-Publications, andestablishing the procedure for assigning DOIs to our manuscripts for future online publication.

We would also like to thank our faculty advisors, Dr. Luz and Dr. Trottier, for their support in helping us coordinate this transition to e-Publication.

 

Final Words:

As the longest-running journal run by medical students for medical students, we at the MSRJ strive to provide the highest quality product and experience for our student contributors. We hope that the addition of e-Publication will provide medical students another platform to promote their scholarship and research. and would like to thank our authors for their great submissions, support, and patience as we transition into this new phase.

MSRJ Elective Update: Academic Medicine

Posted by on Feb 16, 2016 in Elective, Featured | 0 comments

MSRJ Elective Update: Academic Medicine

On Wednesday, February 10, Dr. Rajil Karnani came to the East Lansing campus to talk to the students in the MSRJ Elective about careers in academic medicine. He presented about the many ways to become involved in academia, and the variety of career pathways that academic medicine can offer.  He covered the advantages and disadvantages to consider, along with the keys to success that he has learned over the years. Dr. Karnani also gave some personal anecdotes on his experience and some tricks of the trade that he wished he knew when he entered the field. Lastly, Dr. Karnani fielded questions from the 30 students who attended the lecture. The students enjoyed the lecture and found it very informative, as careers in academic medicine are seldom talked about during our learning and training.

 

Student question and answer session with Dr. Rajil Karnani

Student question and answer session with Dr. Rajil Karnani.

 

Dr. Rajil Karnani lectures to the MSRJ Elective students about pursuing a career in academic medicine.

Dr. Rajil Karnani lectures to the MSRJ Elective students about pursuing a career in academic medicine.

Editorial Staff 2015-2016

Posted by on Jul 26, 2015 in Featured, Staff | 0 comments

Editorial Staff 2015-2016

Introducing the new 2015 – 2016 editorial staff for the MSRJ! We are beyond excited for the upcoming academic year as we welcome 20+ new junior editors to the experienced MSRJ staff. The journal has been making incredible progress and we look forward to another productive year publishing impressive article submissions and supporting medical student research around the world! (more…)

Vol. 4: Winter 2015

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Vol. 4: Winter 2015

MSRJ – Volume 4 – Winter 2015

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Winter 2015 – Care for Laotian Ethnic Minorities: A Cross-National Study of Medical Students in Laos and California

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

Care for Laotian Ethnic Minorities: A Cross-National Study of Medical Students in Laos and California

Author: Katherine Crabtree1,Oanh L. Meyer2, Tonya L. Fancher3

Author Affiliations:

1UC Davis College of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA

2UC Davis School of Medicine, Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, Sacramento, CA, USA

3UC Davis School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA

Full Text Article PDF

Corresponding Author: Katherine Crabtree, katcrabtree[at]gmail.com

Key Words: Hmong; Mien; Laos, refugees; cross-cultural healthcare; medical education.

Abstract: Background: In both the United States and Laos, Lao ethnic minority patients face cultural and linguistic challenges to adequate medical care. We may be able to learn from Lao experiences to improve care for patients in the United States. This study explored Laotian and American medical students’ experiences in care for these patients. Methods: Laotian and American medical students (n_19) participated in five interview groups discussing barriers to health care and strategies for addressing barriers for Laotian ethnic minority patients. Results: The students identified similar barriers to care. Laotian students identified unique strategies to address barriers to care. American students focused on general approaches to cross-cultural care. Discussion: The strategies that Laotian medical students learn in their training reflect their extensive exposure to Hmong and other Laotian ethnic minority patients, while American students learn broad strategies to care for many minority groups. Further work is needed to determine if their experience can be translated into the domestic context.

Published on date: January 1, 2015

Senior Editor: Ghadear Shukr

Junior Editor: Nadine Talia

DOI: Pending

Citation: Crabtree K, Fancher TL, Meyer TL. Care for Laotian Ethnic Minorities: A Cross-National Study of Medical Students in Laos and California. Medical Student Research Journal. 2015;4(Winter):66-70.

References:

  1. Ghent A. Overcoming migrants’ barriers to health. Bull World Health Org 2008; 8: 583-4.
  2. Habarad J. Refugees and the structure of opportunity: transitional adjustments to aid among U.S. resettled Lao Iu Mien, 1980-1985. Center Migrat Stud Spec Issues 1987; 5: 66-87.
  3. Yeung B. We are the people: the history of the Iu-Mien. SF Weekly 2001; 20.
  4. Lum T. Laos: background and U.S. relations. Congressional Research Service Report for Congress 2008. Available from: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL34320.pdf [cited 20 December 2011].
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  6. Catanzaro A. Health status of refugees from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. JAMA 1982; 247: 1303-8.
  7. Laos overview. World directory of minorities and indigenous peoples. 2005. Available from: http://www.minorityrights.org/4014/laos/laos-overview.html [cited 20 January 2014].
  8. Depke J. Coalition building and the intervention wheel to address breast cancer screening in Hmong women. Clin Med Res 2011; 9: 1-6.
  9. Murphy-Thalacker K. Hypertension and the Hmong community: using the health belief model for health promotion. Health Promot Pract 2010; 13: 6.
  10. Johnson S. Hmong health beliefs and experiences in the western health care system. J Transcult Nurs 2002; 13: 126-32.
  11. Culhane-Pera K. ‘We are out of balance here’: a Hmong cultural model of diabetes. J Immigr Minor Health 2007; 9:179-90.
  12. BBC. Thai army deports Hmong to Laos. 2009. Available from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8432094.stm [cited 7 January 2013].
  13. de Boer H, Lamxay V. Plants used during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum healthcare in Lao PDR: a comparative study of the Brou, Saek and Kry ethnic groups. J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2009; 5: 25.
  14. Sydara K. Use of traditional medicine in Lao PDR. Complement Ther Med 2005; 13: 199_205.
  15. Douangphachanh X. Availability and use of emergency obstetric care services in public hospitals in Laos PDR: a systems analysis. Biosci Trend 2010; 4: 318-24.
  16. UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. Concluding observations, Lao People’s Democratic Republic; 2005. Available from: http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/42de64284.html [cited 23 December 2012].
  17. Kanashiro J, Hollaar G, Wright B, Nammavongmixay K, Roff S. Setting priorities for teaching and learning: an innovative needs assessment for a new family medicine program in Lao PDR. Acad Med 2007; 82: 231-7.
  18. Shirayama Y. Modern medicine and indigenous health beliefs: malaria control alongside ‘Sadsana-phee’. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 2006; 37: 622-9.
  19. Fadiman A. The spirit catches you and you fall down: a Hmong child, her American doctors, and the collision of two cultures. New York: Noonday Press; 1998.
  20. Hmong American Partnership. Available from: http://www.hmong.org/page334122813.aspx [cited 27 November 2012].
  21. Reznik V. Hais cuaj txub kaum txub _ to speak of all things: a Hmong cross-cultural case study. J Immigr Health 2001; 3: 23-30.
  22. Michaud J. Handling mountain minorities in China, Vietnam and Laos: from history to current concerns. Asian Ethnicity 2009; 10: 25-49.
  23. Keomany S. Toad poisoning in Laos. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2007; 77: 850-3.
  24. Miles B. Qualitative data analysis: an expanded sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage; 1994.
  25. Dedoose web application for managing, analyzing, and presenting qualitative and mixed method data. Los Angeles, CA: Socio Cultural Research Consultants, LLC; 2012.
  26. Martin D. Refugees and Asylees: 2011 annual flow report. US Department of Homeland Security Office of Immigration Statistics. Available from: http://www.dhs.gov/refugees-andasylees-2011 [cited 1 November 2012].
  27. Bhutanese refugee health profile. CDC; 2012. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/immigrantrefugeehealth/profiles/bhutanese/background/index.html [cited 22 December 2012].
  28. World Health Organization (2012). Country health profiles. Available from: http://www.who.int/countries/en/ [cited 22 December 2012].
  29. Wong C. Adherence with hypertension care among Hmong Americans. J Community Health Nurs 2005; 22: 143-56.

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Winter 2015 – Sticking to the Plan: Patient Preferences for Epidural Use During Labor

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

Sticking to the Plan: Patient Preferences for Epidural Use During Labor

Author: Lauren Ann Gamble1, Ashley Hesson1, Tiffany Burns2.

Author Affiliations:

1College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

2Department of Family Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

Full Text Article PDF

Corresponding Author: Lauren Ann Gamble, gambleL2[at]msu.edu

Key Words: epidural; birth plan; labor analgesia; patient preference, decision making.

Abstract: Background: Women have been shown to value control in the labor experience, a desire that is often formalized into an explicit birth plan. Epidural preferences are a primary component of this plan. Despite this specification, women’s plans are not always carried out. This may be due to patient factors (e.g., dissatisfaction with labor), provider behaviors (e.g., frequent epidural offers), or situational variables (e.g., prolonged labor). Purpose: The current study investigates the relative impact of patient preference for epidural use as compared to provider suggestion and circumstances of labor. It hypothesizes that providing an epidural preference in a birth plan and receiving frequent epidural offers will predict epidural administration. Methods: Adult, postpartum women were surveyed about their labor experience at a high-volume obstetrics unit in a medium-sized community hospital. Responses to a structured survey instrument focused on prelabor preferences and labor characteristics. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression modeling were used to analyze participant responses. Results: Eighty-three postlaboring women completed surveys, of which 79 surveys were analyzed. Eighty-four percent (N_66) received an epidural during their labor process, while 73% (N_58) desired an epidural as a part of their birth plan. Women were offered an epidural at a mean frequency of 0.2790.48 times per hour (median_0.14). The significant predictors of epidural administration were desire for an epidural in the birth plan (pB0.01) and the frequency of epidural offers (pB0.01). Wanting an epidural was associated with receiving an epidural. Conversely, increased frequency of being offered an epidural negatively correlated with epidural administration. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that personal preference is the most influential factor in determining whether or not a laboring woman will receive an epidural. Increasing provider attempts to offer an epidural – as represented by increased frequency of queries- decreased the likelihood that an epidural would be received.

Published on date: January 1, 2015

Senior Editor: Tina Chaalan

Junior Editor: Jennifer Monacelli

DOI: Pending

Citation: Gamble LA, Hesson A, Burns T. Sticking to the Plan: Patient Preferences for Epidural Use During Labor. Medical Student Research Journal. 2015;4(Winter):59-65.

References:

 

 

  1. Pilnick A, Dingwall R. On the remarkable persistence of asymmetry in doctor/patient interaction: a critical review. Soc Sci Med 2011; 72: 1374-82.
  2. Simkin P. Birth plans: after 25 years, women still want to be heard. Birth 2007; 34(1): 49-51.
  3. Namey EE, Lyerly AD. The meaning of ‘‘control’’ for childbearing women in the US. Soc Sci Med 2010; 71(4): 769-76.
  4. Miller AC, Shriver TE. Women’s childbirth preferences and practices in the United States. Soc Sci Med 2012; 75(4):709-16.
  5. Pennell A, Salo-Coombs V, Herring A, Spielman F, Fecho K. Anesthesia and analgesia_related preferences and outcomes of women who have birth plans. J Midwifery Women’s Health 2011; 56(4): 376-81.
  6. Horowitz ER, Yogev Y, Ben-Haroush A, Kaplan B. Women’s attitude toward analgesia during labor – a comparison between 1995 and 2001. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2004; 117(1): 30-32.
  7. Thompson R, Miller YD. Birth control: to what extent do women report being informed and involved in decisions about pregnancy and birth procedures? BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2014; 14(1): 62.
  8. Toledo P, Sun J, Peralta F, Grobman WA, Wong CA, Hasnain-Wynia R. A qualitative analysis of parturients’ perspectives on neuraxial labor analgesia. Int J Obstet Anesth 2013; 22(2): 119-23.
  9. Fro¨ hlich S, Tan T, Walsh A, Carey M. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent. Irish Med J 2012; 104(10): 300-2.
  10. Pain relief during labor. ACOG committee opinion No 295. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2004; 104: 213.
  11. Johnson DE. Getting off the GoldVarb standard: introducing Rbrul for mixed-effects variable rule analysis. Lang Linguist Compass 2009; 3: 359-83.
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  13. Hadar E, Raban O, Gal B, Yogev Y, Melamed N. Obstetrical outcome in women with self-prepared birth plan. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2012; 25(10): 2055-7.
  14. Hidaka R, Callister LC. Giving birth with epidural analgesia: the experience of first-time mothers. J Perinat Educ 2012; 21: 24.
  15. Kannan S, Jamison RN, Datta S. Maternal satisfaction and pain control in women electing natural childbirth. Reg Anesth Pain Med 2001; 26(5): 468-72.
  16. Hodnett ED. Pain and women’s satisfaction with the experience of childbirth: a systematic review. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2002; 186(5): S160-72.
  17. Lawrence HC III, Copel JA, O’Keeffe DF, Bradford WC, Scarrow PK, Kennedy HP, et al. Quality patient care in labor and delivery: a call to action. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2012; 207: 147-8.

 

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Winter 2015 – In Situ Thrombosis of the Pulmonary Arteries: An Emerging New Perspective on Pulmonary Embolism

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

In Situ Thrombosis of the Pulmonary Arteries: An Emerging New Perspective on Pulmonary Embolism

Author: Virginia Corbett1, Houria Hassouna2, Reda Girgis3

Author Affiliations:

1College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

2Division of Thrombosis, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA

Full Text Article PDF

Corresponding Author: Virginia Corbett, corbettv[at]msu.edu

Key Words: pulmonary embolism; in situ pulmonary artery thrombosis; deep vein thrombosis (DVT); pulmonary circulation; Virchow’s triad

Abstract: The annual incidence of pulmonary embolism(PE) in the United States is reported to be 0.69 per1,000 persons with mortality of up to 30% depending upon the size of the emboli.1 PE and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are both considered manifestations ofthe same disease of venous thromboembolism. Virchowpostulated that dysfunction of vessel walls, alternationsin blood flow and hypercoagulability of theblood triggered inappropriate thrombus formation.2 DVT most commonly occurs as local clot formation in the deep calf veins. PE arises when clots break off from a peripheral DVT and become lodged within the pulmonary arterial vasculature. PE is routinely diagnosed when filling defects are found in the pulmonary arteries on computed tomography angiogram (CTA). Among the general population of patients presenting to emergency rooms, absence of DVT may occur in up to 57% of those diagnosed with PE.3 A high prevalence of isolated PE may suggest localized thrombus formation in the pulmonary arteries instead of embolization from peripheral clots.

Published on date: January 1, 2015

Senior Editor: Kailyne Van Stavern

Junior Editor: Garrett Roe

DOI: Pending

Citation: Corbett V. Hassouna H. Girgis R. In Situ Thrombosis of the Pulmonary Arteries: An Emerging New Perspective on Pulmonary Embolism . Medical Student Research Journal. 2015;4(Winter):54-8.

References:

  1. Office of the Surgeon General (US); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (US). The surgeon general’s call to action to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. 2008. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44181/ [cited 15 February 2014].
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  4. Van belle A, Bu¨ ller HR, Huisman MV, Huisman PM, Kaasjager K, Kamphuisen PW, et al. Effectiveness of managing suspected pulmonary embolism using an algorithm combining clinical probability, D-dimer testing, and computed tomography. JAMA 2006; 295(2): 172_9. doi: 10.1001/jama.295.2.172
  5. Kumar NG, Clark A, Roztocil E, Caliste X, Gillespie DL,Cullen JP. Fibrinolytic activity of endothelial cells from different venous beds. J Surg Res 2015; 194(1): 297_303. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2014.09.028
  6. Rosenhek R, Korschineck I, Gharehbaghi-schnell E, Jakowitsch J, Bonderman D, Huber K, et al. Fibrinolytic balance of the arterial wall: pulmonary artery displays increased fibrinolytic potential compared with aorta. Lab Invest 2003; 83(6): 871_6. doi: 10.1097/01.LAB.0000073127.46392.9D
  7. Ryan US. Metabolic activity of pulmonary endothelium: modulations of structure and function. Annu Rev Physiol 1986; 48(1): 263_77. doi: 10.1146/annurev.ph.48.030186.001403.
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  10. Key NS, Bach RR. Tissue factor as a therapeutic target. Thromb Haemost 2001; 85(3): 375_6. doi: 10.1517/14728222.6.2.159
  11. Martinelli I. Unusual forms of venous thrombosis and thrombophilia. Pathophysiol Haemost Thromb 2002; 32(5_6): 343_5. doi: 10.1159/000073595
  12. Agarwal PP, Wolfsohn AL, Matzinger FR, Seely JM, Peterson RA, Dennie C. In situ central pulmonary artery thrombosis in primary pulmonary hypertension. Acta Radiol 2005; 46(7): 696_700. doi: 10.1080/02841850500215501
  13. Russo A, De luca M, Vigna C, De Rito V, Pacilli M, Lombardo A, et al. Central pulmonary artery lesions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a transesophagealechocardiography study. Circulation 1999; 100(17): 1808_15. doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.100.17.1808
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Winter 2015 – White Coat Sparty

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

White Coat Sparty.

Author:  Carter Anderson

Author Affiliations: College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

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Corresponding author: Carter Anderson; carterbanderson[at]yahoo.com

Key Words: N/A

Abstract: Professional responsibility, compassion, honesty, respect for others, competence, and social responsibility are the characteristics that the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine strives to instill in every student.

Published on date: January 1, 2015

Senior Editor: N/A

Junior Editor: N/A

DOI: pending

Citation: Anderson C. White Coat Sparty. Medical Student Research Journal. 2015;4(Winter):52-53.

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Winter 2015 – Letter from the Editors

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

Letter From the Editors.

Author: Jessica L Wummel1, Jack C Mettler2

Author Affiliations: 1College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA, 2College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Flint, MI, USA

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Corresponding Author: Jessica L Wummel; Jessica[at]msrj.org, Jack C Mettler; Jack[at]msrj.org

Key Words: N/A

Abstract: The editors of MSRJ are excited to announce our Winter 2015 issue. As always, we were incredibly impressed by the caliber of submissions. This issue includes interesting articles written by medical students from UC Davis College of Medicine and Michigan State University College of Human Medicine.

Published on date: January 1, 2015

Senior Editor: N/A

Junior Editor: N/A

DOI: Pending

Citation: Wummel JL, Mettler JC. Letter From the Editors. Medical Student Research Journal. 2015;4(Winter):51.

References: N/A