Medical Students Create Art Depicting the Doctor-Patient Relationship

Medical Students Create Art Depicting the Doctor-Patient Relationship

Each fall, the first year medical students at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine are asked to create an art project for their “Doctor/Patient Relationship” course.

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Fall 2014 – The Growth of Medical Student Opportunities in Global Health

The Growth of Medical Student Opportunities in Global Health. Author: Johnathan Kao, MPH Author Affiliations: College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Flint, MI, USA Full Text Article PDF Corresponding Author: Johnathan Kao; johnathan.kao[at]msrj.org Key Words: sexual health; relationships; intimacy; radiotherapy; psycho-supportive treatment; hormone therapy. Abstract: Since the establishment of the World Health Organization on April 7, 1948,1 global health has grown in prominence and popularity among health care workers at all levels of training. International clinical rotation electives have been available to students for over half a century2 and interest in these programs has risen steadily over the decades. During this period, many organizations established programs for students and faculty interested in global health research and service. In 2006, these organizations united under the WHO’s Global Health Workforce Alliance to assist students and faculty in becoming more involved in global health activities.3 Despite these Changes, in 2007, Drain et al recognized a lack of global health education in medical schools and growing student interest, calling for more opportunities to fill the gap.4 Published on date: September 31, 2014 Senior Editor: N/A Junior Editor: N/A DOI: Pending Citation: Kao J. The Growth of Medical Student Opportunities in Global Health. Medical Student Research Journal. 2014;4(Fall):48-50. References: World Health Organization. History of WHO. 2014. Accessed from: http://www.who.int/about/history/en/ [cited 21 June 2014]. Bissonette R, Route C. The Educational Effect of Clinical Rotations in Nonindustrialized Countries. Fam Med 1994; 26(4):226-31. World Health Organization. Global Health Education Consortium. 2014. Accessed from: http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/members_partners/member_list /ghec/en/ [cited 21 June 2014]. Drain PK, Primack A, Hunt DD, Fawzi WW, Holmes KK, Gardner P. Global Health in Medical Education: A Call for More Training and Opportunities. Acad Med 2007; 82(3):226-30. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3180305cf9 Hag C, Rothenberg D, Gjerde C, Bobula J, Wilson C, Bickley L, Cardelle A, Joseph A. New World Views: Preparing Physicians in Training for Global Health Work. Fam Med 2000; 32(8):566-72. Medical School Graduation Questionnaire: All School Summary Report. 2013. Accessed from: https://www.aamc.org/download/350998/data/2013 gqallschoolssummaryreport.pdf [cited 21 June 2014]. Imperato PJ. A Third World International Health Elective for U.S. Medical Students: The 25-year Experience of the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center. J Community Health 2004; 29(5):337-73. doi:10.1023/b:johe.0000038652.65641.0d Pust RE, Moher SP. A Core Curriculum for International Health: Evaluating Ten Years’ Experience at the University of Arizona. Acad Med 1992; 67(2):90-4. doi:10.1097/00001888-199202000-00007 Haq C, Rothenberg D, Gjerde C, Bobula J, Wilson C, Bickley L, Cardelle A, Joseph A. New World Views: Preparing Physicians in Training for Global Health Work. Fam Med 2000; 32(8):566-72. Suchdev P, Ahrens K, Click E, Macklin L, Evangelista D, Graham E. A Model for Sustainable Short-Term International Medical Trips. Ambul Pediatr 2007; 7(4):317-20. doi: 10.1016/j.ambp.2007.04.003 Montgomery LM. Short-Term Medical Missions: Enhancing or Eroding Health? Missiology 1993; 21(3):333-41. doi: 10.1177/009182969302100305 Crump JA, Sugarman J, Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training (WEIGHT). Ethics and Best Practice Guidelines for Training Experiences in Global Health. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2010; 83(6):1178-82. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.2010.10-0527 AAMC GSA Steering Committee. Guidelines for Premedical and Medical Students Providing Patient Care During Clinical Experiences. AAMC 2011. Accessed from: https://www.aamc.org/download/181690/data/guidelinesforstudentsprovidingpatientcare.pdf [cited 21 June 2014]. DeCamp M, Enumah S, O’Neill D, Sugarman J. Perceptions of a Short-Term Medical Programme in the Dominican Republic: Voices of Care Recipients. Glob Public Health 2014; 9(4):411-25. doi: 10.1080/17441692.2014.893368 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. Common Program Requirements. ACGME 2013. Accessed from: https://www.acgme.org/ acgmeweb/Portals/0/PFAssets/ProgramRequirements/CPRs2013.pdf [cited 21 June 2014]. Thompson MJ, Huntington MK, Hunt DD, Pinsky LE,...

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Fall 2014 – Comparing Current Screening Modalities for Colorectal Cancer and Precancerous Lesions: Is Colonoscopy the Method of Choice?

Comparing Current Screening Modalities for Colorectal Cancer and Precancerous Lesions: Is Colonoscopy the Method of Choice? Author: Puneet K. Singh Author Affiliations: Saba University School of Medicine, Saba, Dutch Caribbean Full Text Article PDF Corresponding Author: Puneet K. Singh; pun33t.singh[at]gmail.com Key Words: Colonoscopy; colorectal neoplasms; sigmoidoscopy; CT colonography; mass screening. Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the Western world. Presently, screening tools such as colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and computed tomographic colonography (CTC) are available for CRC screening. The debate over which screening tool is most effective in detecting CRC and precancerous lesions is ongoing. Many recent studies have identified colonoscopy as the most sensitive and specific screening modality for CRC. However, a number of factors have prevented colonoscopy from being widely accepted. Less invasive techniques such as sigmoidoscopy and CTC are growing in popularity among physicians and patients who are apprehensive about colonoscopy screening; although many still are yet to experience the procedure first-hand. This literature review will attempt to validate the growing theory that colonoscopy is superior to other modalities for the diagnosis and screening of CRC and reduces the risk of CRC mortality. In order to do so, the paper will compare the risks and benefits of colonoscopy to sigmoidoscopy and CTC. It will further look at the different aspects that encompass a patient’s decision to partake in screening, such as basic knowledge about CRC, history of CRC in the family, advice from physicians and individual beliefs about what screening entails. Finally, this paper will propose ways in which colonoscopy screening can be improved and thus surpass other screening modalities to universally become the first choice for CRC screening. Published on date: September 31, 2014 Senior Editor: Jack Mettler Junior Editor: David Carr DOI: Pending Citation: Singh PK. Comparing Current Screening Modalities for Colorectal Cancer and Precancerous Lesions: Is Colonoscopy the Method of Choice? Medical Student Research Journal. 2014;4(Fall):34-47. References: Holt PR, Kozuch P, Mewar S. Colon cancer and the elderly: from screening to treatment in management of GI disease in the elderly. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2009;23:889-907. doi: 10.1016/j.bpg.2009.10.010 Siegel R, Naishadham D, Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2012. CA Cancer J Clin. 2012;62:10-29. doi:  10.3322/caac.20138 Manne U, Shanmugam C, Katkoori VR, Bumpers HL, Grizzle WE. Development and progression of colorectal neoplasia. Cancer Biomark. 2010;9:235-265. doi: 10.3233/CBM-2011-0160 Qaseem A, Denberg TD, Hopkins RH, Jr., et al. Screening for colorectal cancer: a guidance statement from the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2012;156:378-386. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-156-5-201203060-00010 Centers for Disease C, Prevention. Vital signs: Colorectal cancer screening, incidence, and mortality–United States, 2002-2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011;60:884-889. Lieberman D. Colorectal cancer screening: practice guidelines. Dig Dis. 2012;30 Suppl 2:34-38. doi: 10.1159/000341891 Centers for Disease C, Prevention. Vital signs: colorectal cancer screening test use – United States, 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2013;62:881-888. Kahi CJ, Anderson JC, Rex DK. Screening and surveillance for colorectal cancer: state of the art. Gastrointest Endosc. 2013;77:335-350. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2013.01.002 Rabeneck L, Paszat LF, Saskin R, Stukel TA. Association between colonoscopy rates and colorectal cancer mortality. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010;105:1627-1632. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2010.83 Manser CN, Bachmann LM, Brunner J, Hunold F, Bauerfeind P, Marbet UA. Colonoscopy screening markedly reduces the occurrence of colon carcinomas and carcinoma-related death: a closed cohort study. Gastrointest Endosc. 2012;76:110-117. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2012.02.040 Singh H, Nugent Z, Demers AA, Kliewer EV, Mahmud SM, Bernstein CN. The reduction in...

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Fall 2014 – Alzheimer’s Disease: A Clinical and Basic Science Review

Alzheimer’s Disease: A Clinical and Basic Science Review.  Author: Igor O. Korolev Author Affiliations: College of Osteopathic Medicine and Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Full Text Article PDF Corresponding Author: Igor O. Korolev; korolevi[at]msu.edu Key Words: Alzheimer’s disease; mild cognitive impairment; dementia; neurodegeneration; neuroimaging; biomarkers. Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in older adults and an important public health problem. The purpose of this review article is to provide a brief introduction to AD and the related concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The article emphasizes clinical and neurobiological aspects of AD and MCI that medical students should be familiar with. In addition, the article describes advances in the use of biomarkers for diagnosis of AD and highlights ongoing efforts to develop novel therapies. Published on date: September 31, 2014 Senior Editor: Liza Gill Junior Editor: Timothy Smith DOI: Pending Citation: Korolev IO. Alzheimer’s Disease: A Clinical and Basic Science Review.  Medical Student Research Journal. 2014;4(Fall):24-33. References: Alzheimer A. About a Peculiar Disease of the Cerebral Cortex. Allg Z Psychiatr. 1907; 64: 146-148. Alzheimer A. About a Peculiar Disease of the Cerebral Cortex. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 1987; 1: 3-8. Maurer K, Volk S, Gerbaldo H. Auguste D and Alzheimer’s Disease. Lancet. May 1997; 349(9064): 1546-1549. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(96)10203-8 Gilman, S. Oxford American Handbook of Neurology. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press; 2010. McKhann GM, Knopman DS, Chertkow H, Hyman BT, Jack CR, et al. The diagnosis of dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease: Rocommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimers Dement. May 2011; 7(3): 263-269. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2011.03.005 Shadlen M, Larson E (2012) Evaluation of cognitive impairment and dementia. In: Basow D, editor. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate. Plassman BL, Langa KM, Fisher GG, Heeringa SG, Weir DR, et al. Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study. Neuroepidemiology. 2007; 29: 125–132. doi:10.1159/000109998 Thies W, Bleiler. 2013 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimers Dement. 2013; 9: 208–245. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2013.02.003 Prince M, Bryce R, Albanese E, Wimo A, Ribeiro W, et al. The global prevalence of dementia: a systematic review and metaanalysis. Alzheimers Dement. 2013; 9: 63–75.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2012.11.007 Ott A, Breteler MM, van Harskamp F, Claus JJ, van der Cammen TJ, et al. Prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia: association with education. The Rotterdam study. BMJ 1995; 310: 970–973. Querfurth HW, LaFerla FM. Alzheimer’s disease. N Engl J Med. 2010; 362: 329–344. doi:10.1056/NEJMra0909142 Holtzman DM, Morris JC, Goate AM. Alzheimer’s disease: the challenge of the second century. Sci Transl Med. 2011; 3: 77sr1. doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3002369 Reiman EM, Chen K, Alexander GE, Caselli RJ, Bandy D, et al. Correlations between apolipoprotein E epsilon4 gene dose and brain-imaging measurements of regional hypometabolism. Proc Natl Acad Sci. USA 2005; 102: 8299–8302. doi:10.1073/pnas.0500579102 Hebert LE, Scherr PA, McCann JJ, Beckett LA, Evans DA. Is the Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s Disease Greater for Women than for Men? Am J Epidemiol. 2001; 153: 132–136. doi:10.1093/aje/153.2.132 Stern Y. Cognitive reserve in ageing and Alzheimer’s disease. Lancet Neurol 2012; 11: 1006–1012. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(12)70191-6 Barnes DE, Yaffe K. The projected effect of risk factor reduction on Alzheimer’s disease prevalence. Lancet Neurol. 2011; 10: 819–828. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(11)70072-2 Mann DM. Pyramidal nerve cell loss in Alzheimer’s disease. 1996; 5: 423–427. Norfray JF, Provenzale JM. Alzheimer’s disease: neuropathologic findings and recent advances in imaging. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2004; 182: 3–13. doi:10.2214/ajr.182.1.1820003 Selkoe DJ. Alzheimer’s disease is a synaptic...

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Fall 2014 – A Medical Student Elective Course in Business and Finance: A Needs Analysis and Pilot

A Medical Student Elective Course in Business and Finance: A Needs Analysis and Pilot. Author: Joseph B. Meleca1, Maria Tecos1, Abigail L. Wenzlick1, Rebecca Henry2, Patricia A. Brewer3. Author Affiliations: 1College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, US 2Office of Medical Education, Research and Development, College of Human Medicine, Mighigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA 3Office of Preclinical Curriculum, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Full Text Article PDF Corresponding Author: Joseph B. Meleca; melecajo[at]msu.edu Key Words: curriculum reform; medical business; medical finance; student-led; course; elective; module; student debt. Abstract: Background:  As the knowledge needed by physicians expands past basic science and patient care, students are calling for their medical school education to do the same. At Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, students addressed this concern by developing a pilot elective, Medical Business and Finance (MBF). The goal of this student-led elective was to provide a basic understanding of personal finance, student debt handling, business management, and insurance reimbursement issues. Methods:  A preliminary needs assessment was conducted to discern if students wanted medical business and finance supplementation to the medical school curriculum.  Ninety percent of students reported interest in a business and finance elective. Once the course was instated, student satisfaction and knowledge-base in medical business and finance was analyzed through pre-elective, pre-session and post-elective survey. Results:  Results were analyzed on forty-eight students’ pre-survey and post-survey responses.  After the course, self-assessed student knowledge regarding finance and business nearly doubled.  The average pre-elective self-assessed knowledge of finance was 3.02 on a ten-point scale and knowledge of business was 2.61. This was compared to an average post-elective self-assessed knowledge of 5.75 and 5.44, respectively. Satisfaction in MSU CHM business and finance resources also slightly increased at the completion of the course.  Nearly 85% of students felt they benefited from participating in the elective.  Similarly, 85% felt that incoming students would also benefit from taking the course. Almost 30% of students believed the material covered in the MBF Elective should be in the required medical school curriculum. Conclusion:  A student led elective can be an effective way to introduce students to an array of topics related to medical business and finance. Students felt that their knowledge of these topics increased and they valued the addition of medical business and finance education to their curriculum. A student-led elective is one potential way for others to successfully incorporate these topics into medical school curricula across the country. Published on date: September 31, 2014 Senior Editor: Jon Zande Junior Editor: Ghadear Shukr DOI: Pending Citation: Meleca JB, Tecos M, Wenzlick AL, Henry R, Brewer PA. A Medical Student Elective Course in Business and Finance: A Needs Analysis and Pilot. Medical Student Research Journal. 2014;4(Fall):18-23. References: Cuckler GA, Sisko AM, Keehan SP, et al. National health expenditure projections, 2012-22: Slow growth until coverage expands and economy Improves.  Health Affairs. 2013; 32: 1820-31. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0721 Asch DA, Nicholson S, Vujicic M. Are we in a medical education bubble market? N Engl J Med. 2013; 369: 1973-1975. doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1310778 Tilburt JC, Cassel CK. Why the ethics of parsimonious medicine is not the ethics of rationing. JAMA. 2013; 309: 773-744. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.368 Wholey MH, Chapman JE. Business and managerial education in the medical school curriculum. South Med J. 1990; 83(2): 204-6. doi: 10.1097/00007611-199002000-00017 Hsu BS, Hosokawa MC, Maria...

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